how many grad schools should i apply to phd

According to most experts, a good rule of thumb is to apply to at least four or five programs, but no more than ten. How Many Grad Schools Should I Apply To? Anything over 30 might be excessive, but I think under 10 is too low. If you don't get in, spend the year beefing up your CV and retake the GRE and try again. Only apply to schools that you would want to attend if accepted, whether that consists of 2 or 20. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts, SSW | BA and MA History | PhD* Human Studies. I wanted to die after like my 5th interview and I quickly realized I didn’t really fit in a few places. I hope you like it there. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. Apply to as many as you'd like to. Haha that made me laugh. :). Apply to all the places that fit. This might be silly. Application fees aside, would we be crazy to apply to more than a dozen? Applying for next cycle (Clinical Psych). If you are applying to Ag/Applied Econ programs the number may be lower since research fit will be more of a consideration in those departments than in pure programs. It's really hard to say because while you may want some safeties, what if they're really not the best suited for you? My advisor is currently of the opinion that I should just apply wherever is a good fit -- upper tier or not. This go-round, I applied to 1. I don't regret it, though, because I expanded my network a lot. It makes no sense to apply to a school that doesn't have someone who can take you on, in places that you don't want to live in, and couldn't afford to live in if you tried. Economics PhD programs, and I ultimately mastered out. The real constraint is the cost of each application (application fee + GRE scores) since it's relative straightforward for your letter writers to submit the same letter to each institution. In the last year of my MS I met his advisor, and now I'm doing a PhD with my MS advisor's advisor at a different uni. 5 to 10 carefully chosen places that have professors who are aligned with your research interests. Can't change the past. Find lots more expert advice on getting into grad school in the newly released book: Graduate School: Winning Strategies For … Some experts suggest starting with at least 15 to 20 schools, and narrowing that list down to the graduate programs you’ll ultimately apply to. Still, I am somewhat scared that no grad school will accept me. Wow. I ended up being accepted by my one choice, and I don't have any publications either, so you definitely still have a chance. You may waste $50-$80 on applying to an easy school that you won't end up attending, but if you are dead set on grad school in the next year then having a fall-back is good. Your best bet is to apply to more than one grad school because admission isn’t guaranteed. I'm a senior. However, maybe someone has a rule of thumb: I am currently finishing my MA thesis and want to do a PhD afterwards. I'm really not sure what to do. Two of us are also changing fields. I got accepted at my first and second choices with funding, so it worked out all right. Compare and contrast these schools by whatever factors are most important to you – for example, cost, reputation, location, or whether or not the program is offered in an online format. ;P. I only applied to one school, but that's because there was only one I wanted to go to. I've heard 5-15 but you might be from a better ranked MA/MS. Discussion forum for current, past, and future students of any discipline completing post-graduate studies - taught or research. I'm in the social sciences but all answers welcome! Same for me. PhD programs are long, and highly individualized considering the different types of labs, advisors, etc. The second year I applied to 21 which worked out much better, so I would reccomend applying to as many as you can afford/have time to fill out (within reason). I went to mine for a career change locally as by husband worked and built a career, while I was not ready to commit to a PhD. By using our Services or clicking I agree, you agree to our use of cookies. I applied to 12 and that was too many. :). My friend is in the same situation where her interests are both policy in developing countries but also healthy/inequality policy so she's thinking the same thing and some of our schools overlap but not all. I am sure this depends on the discipline etc. Interesting. On average, prospective students apply to anywhere from three to eight schools. The admission committee usually looks at a number of factors and sometimes it takes a little bit of luck to get in. I am also in economics and applied to 12 programs. The schools are not conferring with each other to see if you applied elsewhere. A good first step is to sit down and consider how many programs would work for you and then pare down to a complete list. Fellow MA students and I are looking at programs with 10-15% acceptance rates and wish to hedge appropriately! My advice is to only apply where you really want to go. I'm the same. I wouldn't stray below 5 unless you have … This can be a factor in deciding how many schools to apply to. I was advised by a professor to apply to as many as is feasible. That gets me to like 12+ though, and if I include places like Harvard as a real stretch (you never know!) I applied to 15 PhD programs and got interviews at all of them. Another mentor of mine, though, knows the inside scoop on a lot of programs and is redirecting me to some with less drama. Did 10 seem like a lot, would you have done more upper if they seemed like good fits? It's all a balance, really, and depends on your field. I only applied to three that I knew were a good fit and got accepted to two of them. I have 20 on the list right now but aiming to get it to 10. As many as you can afford and interest you in your research interests. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. Interesting! :), The first year I applied to 9 and ended up missing almost all of my interviews due to snow/ice storms canceling my flights and a surprise emergency appendectomy. If you are applying to the more competitive professional-degree programs, then you might want to apply to a few more. Before I came to this sub, and I don't know if this is a geographical difference or just a field difference or what, but I'd never heard of anyone applying for more than three. In econ I think 12-15 is pretty standard. Also, congrats! Press J to jump to the feed. I'm applying to 13 PhD programs and 2 backup, worst-case scenario MA programs. I applied to two, and had decided if I didn’t get into them I didn’t care to go anywhere else, and could just go and get a job with my current degree (in CS so it wouldn’t have been hard). I currently have 5 in the mix, but I think I'm gonna add a couple more. I don't think it matters how many you apply too. 8-10 is probably a better number. Including GRE scores, transcripts, and application fees I would guess closer to $3000. Both applications were successful, so I got my choice. Thankfully I got in. If you are applying to Ag/Applied Econ programs the number may be lower since research fit will be more of a consideration in those departments than in pure programs. I'm in Developmental Psychology. I know, I know. I am certainly the odd one out here: one. However, I wouldn't treat the process like undergrad where you may have safety/fit/reach categories. 1 year ago. A good rule is to apply to all the schools you want to go to and then 1 that you think you have a good chance of getting into. Let’s take a closer look. As a general guideline, you should probably be applying to at least four or five different programs that you are well-qualified for, and probably no more than ten. I'd completed a master's in the same department and it didn't seem like I needed to apply to another. Having said that, there are various guidelines that can be useful for anyone looking to approach their graduate school application process from an informed perspective. :), New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. Press J to jump to the feed. For reference, I applied to 2 masters programs and 5 undergrad programs (1 was a guarantee admit in-state). I was legitimately thinking about the two dozen side of it because my primary interests fit into either health or social policy, which means 18 of the top 20 can be a great to good fit that would allow me to do what I want, at different angles. Only apply to schools that you would want to attend if accepted, whether that consists of 2 or 20. Also got accepted in both so I was set. If I didn't get in, I didn't want to go elsewhere. However, I wouldn't treat the process like undergrad where you may have safety/fit/reach categories. Ten-ish years ago in my first PhD go-round, I applied to 15. $1500 would be a steal for 20 schools if you played your cards right. I've never heard of a magic number like three. It's like "how does X affect women" vs "what role do women play in X" with the first being health and the latter being social. Couldn't be happier since I didn't have to switch research gears (they do very similar things), and I'm funded out the wazoo. Could not tell you why, but three was the magic number for everyone I know. In econ I think 12-15 is pretty standard. The real constraint is the cost of each application (application fee + GRE scores) since it's relative straightforward for your letter writers to …

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