easy blues piano

Just like our C position, we can choose any G on the keyboard and repeat this process. This is what gives a jazzy element to C Jam Blues. What’s up my piano friends! This jazz groove is mostly being played in the bass and drums. 2. If this was challenging for you, you might have to rewind the video and work it a couple times through until you got it. However, you may be relieved to know that simpler music is a springboard for creativity. Remember, we’re starting step-by-step. Click image to get access now. This is what that one sounds like. What we want to do is take a step-by-step approach where we start off simple and gradually add complexity until you can play what I just played in that demo video. Don’t just watch the bonus videos though, take action! If you're just browsing, scroll to the bottom of this page and listen to the audio example to get an idea of what this lesson is about. A good example of that can be found, We’ve been playing these three notes in C position, but now we’re going to take these three notes and play them in G position and they’re all going to sound amazing in this chord progression. Alright, so let’s talk about another extension. He makes this tune interesting using a steady groovy riff and his trademark piano licks. The only difference is that we add a blue note to it. The big secret is that if you play just the three notes I mentioned, in any order and any variation, you can play them over the blues progression and they’re always going to sound good. How cool is that? Just like with our C position, when we play this F sharp, we keep our thumb over G so we can get back up to G position and not lose our place. , Simple Trick to Sound Like “The Piano Guys” (in 5 minutes or less! Easy Jazz Piano – I bet you $1,000,000 you can play it! More chord substitutions in the form of 2-5-1 chord progressions as seen on bar 8 (2-5 leading to the Gm7). Steve is the author of Premium Jazz Elite Membership Incorporating or inserting ii – V chord progressions in a tune to resolve to any chord. It might look really hard and complex, and a lot of piano teachers will just show you something like that, show you the notes, and simply ask you to go play it. It sounds like this. With the G position we also have the option of playing the upper extension of E flat, still played with our fourth finger. 1. Click image to access the method. You can just play three notes in any order, move them anywhere along the keyboard, and you probably have 25-30 notes to work with already, but I don’t want to stop here, I want to start doing some call and response. The reason we do it this way is, let’s say you mess up the first time you play it, well, you can try to get it right the second time, and by the third time you have another chance to get it right. This one has a very boogie woogie kind of feel to it. Of course, we’re going to take it to the next level, expanding the notes. With all the notes I’ve shown you, you can go very very far in the improvisational world. This note isn’t actually part of the blues scale, but it’s a not that sounds really cool. This is going to sound good as well, which you can listen to here. This extension isn’t quite as harsh and “Bluesy” as C sharp, it’s a little more mellow. Get the opportunity to learn the essentials from Blues Hall Of Famer Bruce Katz through the Breakthrough Blues Method. How cool is that? . So, it really would be better to have this split into a bunch of different videos in a video series, which is why what I did for you guys is create a bunch of extra bonus videos to go along with this video. So literally by playing just these three notes you already know how to improvise. Copyright © 2017 - Piano University -Privacy Policy: https://www.bestpianotips.com/privacy-policy -  Contact: [email protected], First, a quick demo of what the finished product will sound like can be found. And now you’re stuck with a mess of musical ideas and zero chops. Easy Blues Piano Songs: 5 Tunes To Learn | Free Jazz Lessons A lot of times teachers use the blues scale to improvise over, well guess what? 3. Speaking of play authentic blues piano, there’s no best way to learn it than from a Blues Hall of Famer himself. Get instant access to the Breakthrough Blues Method here. If you’re learning jazz as a beginner, this is the ideal course for you. In many ways, we would never expect someone like Oscar Peterson to make use of something simple in his music. It adds another cool “bluesy” note to the mix. In the original Howlin’ Wolf recording, everybody in the band plays an E7 chord throughout. The reason I can say that, is because I’ve taught this to so many of my piano students and as long as they put in the practice and the work, they can play it. The exception, however, is the addition of a #iv(b5) chord on the 6th bar. A good example of that can be found here. This is going to be very similar to the C extension notes. You just learned the blues scale and you probably don’t even realize it. Our first extension is going to be F sharp. Basically, it is a minor pentatonic scale. The best place to start getting your groove on with the Blues is Howlin’ Wolf’s “Spoonful”: It’s because you only need to play one chord throughout. I’m trying to really simplify it for you guys. It follows the standard 12-bar blues format. The big secret is that if you play just the three notes I mentioned, in any order and any variation, you can play them over the bl… There’s still time. In the bonus videos I mentioned, it’s going to have specific call and response exercises for using this fourth finger. Click image to grab today. The reason is, a lot of beginners move their entire hand down, but then it’s hard to get back to the home base of the three notes of C, E flat, and F. Now we have five notes in C position, so let’s talk about some extensions in G position. What I want you to do right now is click on. The secret to this note is we want to keep our thumb hovering over the C and then play the B flat with the second finger. Two, somebody might want to repeat all of the beginner exercises four or five times before you move on to the next one. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions for new lessons, please leave a comment below. To get these bonuses, just go to. Are you a blues piano fan? We can take any C, E flat, and F on the keyboard and anywhere we play them across the keyboard it’s always going to sound good in the blues progression. For this one we’re going to play C, E flat, F, E flat, and C. You can see this one, So, it really would be better to have this split into a bunch of different videos in a video series, which is why what I did for you guys is create a bunch of extra bonus videos to go along with this video. Get in there and start practicing. ), BEST Piano Pedal Exercise for Beginners (by FAR…), Learn 4 Chords – Quickly Play Hundreds of Songs! That’s what I’m trying to do with this blog post. I’m sure you’ve heard of the blues scale. We’re going to take it even farther. One last thing before we get started, this is very important, I want you to promise me and commit to watching, We can take any C, E flat, and F on the keyboard and anywhere we play them across the keyboard it’s always going to sound good in the blues progression. Then, there are going to be beginner level exercises with extensions. I’m realizing that would make this blog post incredibly long and I want you to focus on the right hand for now, so I’ll have another blog post on the left hand that you can read through for that. Check out Steve’s. We’re going to do one more, slightly more difficult, and then move on to something else.

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